An Introduction to Morphic Resonance and Morphic Fields

Authored or posted by | Updated on | Published on October 10, 2015
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Sacred Geometry FieldsBy Rupert Sheldrake

(Sheldrake.org) In the hypothesis of formative causation, discussed in detail in my books A New Science of Life and The Presence of the Past, I propose that memory is inherent in nature. Most of the so-called laws of nature are more like habits.

My interest in evolutionary habits arose when I was engaged in research in developmental biology, and was reinforced by reading Charles Darwin, for whom the habits of organisms were of central importance. As Francis Huxley has pointed out, Darwin’’s most famous book could more appropriately have been entitled The Origin of Habits.

Morphic fields in biology

Over the course of fifteen years of research on plant development, I came to the conclusion that for understanding the development of plants, their morphogenesis, genes and gene products are not enough. Morphogenesis also depends on organizing fields. The same arguments apply to the development of animals. Since the 1920s many developmental biologists have proposed that biological organization depends on fields, variously called biological fields, or developmental fields, or positional fields, or morphogenetic fields.

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All cells come from other cells, and all cells inherit fields of organization. Genes are part of this organization. They play an essential role. But they do not explain the organization itself. Why not?

Thanks to molecular biology, we know what genes do. They enable organisms to make particular proteins. Other genes are involved in the control of protein synthesis. Identifiable genes are switched on and particular proteins made at the beginning of new developmental processes. Some of these developmental switch genes, like the Hox genes in fruit flies, worms, fish and mammals, are very similar. In evolutionary terms, they are highly conserved. But switching on genes such as these cannot in itself determine form, otherwise fruit flies would not look different from us.

Many organisms live as free cells, including many yeasts, bacteria and amoebas. Some form complex mineral skeletons, as in diatoms and radiolarians, spectacularly pictured in the nineteenth century by Ernst Haeckel. Just making the right proteins at the right times cannot explain the complex skeletons of such structures without many other forces coming into play, including the organizing activity of cell membranes and microtubules.

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Category: Nature & Space, Universes & Time Matrices

Comments (1)

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  1. Bum says:

    The laws of Nature are not habits.
    Habits are repetitive behaviors, they can serve the organism well or not.
    Darwin was wrong and did not understand nature, nature is not visible .
    Intelligence is inherent in nature. This does not mean that any organism will be guided by it, just as easily caught in( dysfunctional or functional) habitual behaviors ruled by memory. Memory is a function of mind.

    “There is the field and the knower of the field”